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Upcoming Cancer and Work Series Webinars

Join us for an unique series of free, educational webinars on the topic of Cancer and Work cohosted with CancerandWork.ca.  Learn from current research and credible tools to create safe, healthy, productive and inclusive workplaces for those with cancer related health issues.  These webinars are relevant for people with cancer, their families, health professionals, labour representatives and employers.

Many of our webinars qualify for professional education credit. Receive letters of attendance for small administrative fee of $15, or free for WWDPI members. If you missed a live webinar, but still need a certificate of attendance, our webinars on demand might be a right fit for you. We thank our program partners, education advisory committee, and speakers who contribute to this webinar series. The series is partially funded by the Province of BC through the Community Gaming Grants.​​


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Employees Diagnosed with Cancer: Current Perspectives and Future Directions from an Employer’s Point of View​

February 1, 2019 at 8:30 AM PT, 11:30 AM ET, 5:30 PM GMT+1

For cancer survivors, participating at work is of great importance. Work gives them structure, social interaction and financial security. However, returning to work can be complex. The work environment, health care system and several stakeholders can be of influence. One of the key stakeholders in the process is the employer. Employers are in the position to guide the cancer survivor back to work and to create good working conditions. Thereby, employers can facilitate work participation of cancer survivors.

You will learn

  • The important role of the employer for work participation of cancer survivors.
  • When and how to communicate with an employee with cancer as an employer.
  • Tips and tricks for enhancing the collaboration between health professionals, cancer survivor and workplace (employer, colleagues).

​Take-home messages

  • Communication between cancer survivor and his or her employer should start early to achieve a satisfactory dialogue. That is, to prevent misconceptions about preferences and possibilities to stay or return to work, and about when and how to keep in touch.
  • Assumptions regarding the individual importance of work are easily made, but may prevent mutual understanding.
  • Effective collaboration between stakeholders is key factor to enhance work participation.

Michiel Greidanus 

PhD Student, the Coronel Institute of Occupational Health, the Amsterdam UMC, location AMC, The Netherlands

Michiel Greidanus is a PhD-student at the Coronel Institute of Occupational Health of the Amsterdam UMC, location AMC, in The Netherlands. His PhD-project is about the Return to Work (RTW) of employees diagnosed with cancer, with a focus on the role of the employer. He developed an online intervention that supports employers during the RTW process of employees diagnosed with cancer. This online intervention consists of communication video's, to the point information and is easily accessible for employers. Additionally, he developed a new measurement instrument that measures successful RTW.  Michiel is also involved in education of medical students.


Sietske Tamminga, PhD


Assistant professor at the Coronel Institute of Occupational Health, the Amsterdam UMC, location AMC, The Netherland


Dr. Sietske Tamminga is an assistant professor at the Coronel Institute of Occupational Health of the Amsterdam UMC, location AMC, in The Netherlands. The focus of her research is on enhancing the return to work (RTW) of cancer survivors by supporting the cancer survivor, the employer or healthcare professionals. She is involved in the supervision of PhD students and has been involved in the training of nurses on cancer and work. She published many peer reviewed scientific articles on cancer and work as well as articles for a lay audience. She obtained among others funding from the Dutch Cancer Society. ​

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Recorded Webinars​

Work Outcomes in Self-Employed Cancer Survivors

Tuesday November 27, 2018 at 8:30 AM PT, 11:30 AM ET

​​Co-Hosted with Cancerandwork.ca​​. 

The proportion of people of working age who are diagnosed with cancer is expected to rise in coming years.  At the same time, in many western countries, the proportion of people in the workforce who are self-employed is growing. For example, the Europe 2020 strategy encourages European Union member states to promote self-employment as a driver of economic growth. 

The past decade has seen an explosion in knowledge about the adverse effects of cancer on people's working lives. Despite the growing importance of the self-employed as a group, there has been a lack of research investigating the impact of cancer on self-employed people.

The session will present findings from recently published research which bought together several datasets from different European countries to examine work-related outcomes in self-employed cancer survivors.  It will discuss: differences between self-employed and salaried cancer survivors; variations across countries; and factors which influence work-related outcomes in self-employed survivors.  It will also: review the state of the evidence internationally; highlight evidence gaps and where further research is needed; and discuss challenges in conducting research on this largely neglected population.​

You will learn:

  • How cancer affects the working life of those who are self-employed
  • How patterns of work participation, and health outcomes, after cancer differ between salaried workers and the self-employed
  • What factors influence work participation following a cancer diagnosis
  • That self-employed cancer survivors may experience poorer work-related outcomes or health outcomes than salaried survivors
  • How national social welfare provisions may drive work engagement following a cancer diagnosis, especially in people who are self-employed
  • That self-employed people consider the needs of their business as well as their health needs after a cancer diagnosis 
  • The areas where further research is needed
  • What issues need to be considered in developing interventions/strategies to support work engagement after cancer in people who are self-employed​

Linda Sharp, PhD

Professor of Cancer Epidemiology, Institute of Health & Society at Newcastle University, UK​

Linda Sharp is a Professor of Cancer Epidemiology at Newcastle University in the UK.  She has been conducting research in cancer survivorship for more than 12 years.  Workforce participation after a cancer diagnosis is one of her major interests. She has led a range of qualitative, epidemiological and economic studies which have examined different aspects of this issue and has published widely on this topic. She is a leading member of the EU Cancer and Work Network (CANWON).​​​


Co-moderators:

​Lucie Kocum, PhD

Core Team Member of the Cancer and Work Research Group and Associate Professor in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Saint Mary’s University

​​Dr. Lucie Kocum is a core team member of the Cancer and Work research group.  She is also an Associate Professor in Industrial/Organizational Psychology at Saint Mary's University, and a member of the CN Centre for Occupational Health. At Saint Mary's University, she teaches graduate-level knowledge translation, research methods and statistics and supervises Honours, Masters, and Doctoral trainees in occupational health psychology, applied health services research, knowledge translation, and industrial psychology (namely personnel measurement). Her mixed-methods quantitative and qualitative research programs in return to work interventions, psychosocial oncology, and occupational health psychology are funded through grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, and the Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation as well as the Nova Scotia Department of Communities, Culture, and Heritage.​

Maureen Parkinson, M.Ed. C.C.R.C

Provincial Vocational Rehablitation Counsellor,  BC Cancer and Co-Director of Cancer and Work

Ms. Maureen Parkinson is the province-wide vocational rehabilitation counsellor at the BC Cancer. She has also been vocational rehabilitation counsellor at a public rehabilitation hospital and vocational rehabilitation consultant to insurance companies and the court system. She has instructed and facilitated Service-Canada-funded programs on job searching and career exploration. Ms. Parkinson has a Masters in Counselling Psychology, is a Canadian Certified Rehabilitation Counsellor, and completed the Certified Return to Work Coordinator Program through the National Institute for Disability Management and Research. She has developed return-to-work and job-search seminars for cancer patients and created the guidebook “Cancer and Returning to Work: A Practical Guide for Cancer Patients” as well as on-line articles about returning to work and school. She also co-authored a paper commissioned by the Canadian Association of Psychosocial Oncology, “Cancer and Work: A Canadian Perspective”.

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Employers’ Management of Employees Affected by Cancer

Wednesday October 17, 2018 at 8:30 AM PT, 11:30 AM ET

CPHRBCYK-accreditation-seal-web.pngCo-Hosted with Cancerandwork.ca.​ 

Over the next decade, the number of people who will live 5 years or more after cancer diagnosis is projected to increase. Return to work (RTW) after cancer is of increasing importance to individuals, employers and wider society. Although some people affected by cancer are able to continue working, a greater proportion of these survivors end up unemployed, retire early or change jobs than those without a diagnosis of cancer. Cancer survivors identify the role played by co-workers, line managers, and employers as important in supporting and sustaining a successful RTW. However, one of the reasons for not achieving a successful RTW is the lack of understanding and support from employers, supervisors and colleagues. Given the potential importance of their role in the RTW process for cancer survivors, the aim of this webinar is to explore the current evidence on the factors that are likely to influence the employer’s management of employees recovering from cancer. The webinar will cover evidence derived from a systematic review of the literature and will recommend some suggestions for improving practice and for future research in this area.

 
You will learn:
  • The economic burden of sick leave and early retirement for the employee, his/her employer and wider society;
  • The legal responsibility of the employer;
  • The existence and importance of a formal workplace policy for managing employees diagnosed with cancer;
  • The meaning and effect of the increasing trend towards the devolution of human resource (HR) work to line managers on the process of RTW;
  • The meaning of the "rhetoric-reality gap";
  • The perceptions of cancer from the employer perspective;
  • Line-managers' attitudes towards managing employees affected by cancer;
  • Factors related to employer management of employed cancer survivors.

 

Ziv Amir, PhD

University of Salford · School of Health Sciences ​

 

Ziv Amir is Honorary Professor in Cancer Survivorship at the University of Salford, UK. He is a social scientist with an extensive experience in research on the link between health and work, with a focus on the role of employers in facilitating return to work. Dr Amir’s work has been published in various peer-reviewed journals, webinars and shared with European colleagues participated in the COST network – CANWON. Through his work in the area, he established significant links with relevant occupational health practitioners and trade union representatives.
Until 2012 Ziv was the Director of the Macmillan Research Unit at the University of Manchester, UK. The research programme, which was funded by Macmillan Cancer Support (UK cancer charity), aimed at exploring the economic aspects of people disabled by cancer and included both quantitative and qualitative studies.  ​​


Co-moderators:

Christine Maheu, RN, PhD

Associate Professor, Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University and Co-director of Cancer and Work

Dr. Christine Maheu is an Associate Professor in the Ingram School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University and FRQS Chercheur Boursier Junior 2. Dr. Maheu is also an Affiliate Scientist at the University Health Network and the University of Toronto. At McGill University, she teaches research methods, supervises graduate students (masters, doctoral, post-doctoral), mentors practicing nurses and students in research, and conducts research in English and French. She has held research awards with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Canadian Cancer Society, and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. These awards funded her research in psychosocial oncology, which focuses on developing and testing psychosocial interventions or measurements tools for various cancer populations. Additionally, in partnership with Ipsos Canada and funded by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, she is co-leading a nationwide survey of the needs of cancer patients for transition care from the end of their treatment to three years after their diagnosis. Dr. Maheu received awards for excellence in nursing research (2013, 2015, 2016) from Ovarian Cancer Canada, the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology, and the Quebec Association of Nurses in Oncology.​

Maureen Parkinson, M.Ed. C.C.R.C

Provincial Vocational Rehablitation Counsellor,  BC Cancer and Co-Director of Cancer and Work

Ms. Maureen Parkinson is the province-wide vocational rehabilitation counsellor at the BC Cancer. She has also been vocational rehabilitation counsellor at a public rehabilitation hospital and vocational rehabilitation consultant to insurance companies and the court system. She has instructed and facilitated Service-Canada-funded programs on job searching and career exploration. Ms. Parkinson has a Masters in Counselling Psychology, is a Canadian Certified Rehabilitation Counsellor, and completed the Certified Return to Work Coordinator Program through the National Institute for Disability Management and Research. She has developed return-to-work and job-search seminars for cancer patients and created the guidebook “Cancer and Returning to Work: A Practical Guide for Cancer Patients” as well as on-line articles about returning to work and school. She also co-authored a paper commissioned by the Canadian Association of Psychosocial Oncology, “Cancer and Work: A Canadian Perspective”.​

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Sustained Employability of Cancer Patients and Survivors: Are We Getting Any Closer?

Wednesday September 26, 2018 at 8:30 AM PT, 11:30 AM ET

CPHRBCYK-accreditation-seal-web.pngCo-Hosted with Cancerandwork.ca.​ 

Worldwide, about 40%–50% of all cancer patients are of working age at time of diagnosis. Because of developments in cancer screening and treatment, but also because of the increase in the retirement age in several countries, it is expected that this percentage will increase in the near future. Cancer survivors report that being able to work is one of the most important contributors to their quality of life. Still, it has been shown that cancer survivors in general are more likely to be unemployed than healthy controls. Many health care providers do not ask the essential question: “how are the diagnosis and treatment affecting your work?” Consequently, the first significant step in arranging adequate work-related support or preventing adverse work-related outcomes for cancer survivors, both at short-term and at long-term follow-up, is missed or at least delayed.

You will learn:

  • about adverse work outcomes cancer patients and survivors experience during the whole cancer care continuum;
  • about predictive factors for returning to work and staying at work both short and long-term after diagnosis;
  • about interventions to support cancer patients and survivors to return to work and stay at work beyond their return.​

Take-home messages;

  • About 40%–50% of all cancer patients are of working age at time of diagnosis, and this percentage will probably increase in the near future;  
  • Cancer survivors report that being able to work is one of the most important contributors to their quality of life;
  • Cancer survivors in general are more likely to be unemployed than the general healthy population;
  • Health care providers frequently do not ask cancer patients and survivors the essential question: "how are the diagnosis and treatment affecting your work?";
  • About two-third of cancer survivors is able to (partly) return to work at some point after diagnosis and treatment;


 

Saskia Duijts, PhD​

 Program Leader, Oncology - University Medical Center in Groning, NL
Dr. Saskia Duijts is a senior researcher who received her PhD in Occupational Health Epidemiology in 2007. She worked a few years in Cancer Epidemiology, and since 2010, she started to combine both interests, primarily doing research in ‘Cancer and Work’. Currently, as a Program Leader, she is expanding her research towards ‘Oncology in Primary Care’. She is an editor for the European Journal of Cancer Care, and the chair of the Dutch Cancer Society Psycho Oncology Committee.​


Co-moderators:

Christine Maheu, RN, PhD

Associate Professor, Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University and Co-director of Cancer and Work

Dr. Christine Maheu is an Associate Professor in the Ingram School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University and FRQS Chercheur Boursier Junior 2. Dr. Maheu is also an Affiliate Scientist at the University Health Network and the University of Toronto. At McGill University, she teaches research methods, supervises graduate students (masters, doctoral, post-doctoral), mentors practicing nurses and students in research, and conducts research in English and French. She has held research awards with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Canadian Cancer Society, and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. These awards funded her research in psychosocial oncology, which focuses on developing and testing psychosocial interventions or measurements tools for various cancer populations. Additionally, in partnership with Ipsos Canada and funded by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, she is co-leading a nationwide survey of the needs of cancer patients for transition care from the end of their treatment to three years after their diagnosis. Dr. Maheu received awards for excellence in nursing research (2013, 2015, 2016) from Ovarian Cancer Canada, the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology, and the Quebec Association of Nurses in Oncology.​

Maureen Parkinson, M.Ed. C.C.R.C

Provincial Vocational Rehablitation Counsellor,  BC Cancer and Co-Director of Cancer and Work

Ms. Maureen Parkinson is the province-wide vocational rehabilitation counsellor at the BC Cancer. She has also been vocational rehabilitation counsellor at a public rehabilitation hospital and vocational rehabilitation consultant to insurance companies and the court system. She has instructed and facilitated Service-Canada-funded programs on job searching and career exploration. Ms. Parkinson has a Masters in Counselling Psychology, is a Canadian Certified Rehabilitation Counsellor, and completed the Certified Return to Work Coordinator Program through the National Institute for Disability Management and Research. She has developed return-to-work and job-search seminars for cancer patients and created the guidebook “Cancer and Returning to Work: A Practical Guide for Cancer Patients” as well as on-line articles about returning to work and school. She also co-authored a paper commissioned by the Canadian Association of Psychosocial Oncology, “Cancer and Work: A Canadian Perspective”.​​

Last Modified: 12/10/2018 9:20 AM