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Sustained Employability of Cancer Patients and Survivors: Are We Getting Any Closer?

Wednesday September 26, 2018 at 8:30 AM PT, 11:30 AM ET

Resources:


CPHRBCYK-accreditation-seal-web.pngCo-Hosted with Cancerandwork.ca, part of our Cancer and Work Series​.​ Co-moderated with Dr. Christine Maheu, RN, PhD and Ms. Maureen Parkinson, M.Ed. C.C.R.C​

​Worldwide, about 40%–50% of all cancer patients are of working age at time of diagnosis. Because of developments in cancer screening and treatment, but also because of the increase in the retirement age in several countries, it is expected that this percentage will increase in the near future. Cancer survivors report that being able to work is one of the most important contributors to their quality of life. Still, it has been shown that cancer survivors in general are more likely to be unemployed than healthy controls. Many health care providers do not ask the essential question: “how are the diagnosis and treatment affecting your work?” Consequently, the first significant step in arranging adequate work-related support or preventing adverse work-related outcomes for cancer survivors, both at short-term and at long-term follow-up, is missed or at least delayed.

You will learn:

  • about adverse work outcomes cancer patients and survivors experience during the whole cancer care continuum;
  • about predictive factors for returning to work and staying at work both short and long-term after diagnosis;
  • about interventions to support cancer patients and survivors to return to work and stay at work beyond their return.

 

Take-home messages;

  • About 40%–50% of all cancer patients are of working age at time of diagnosis, and this percentage will probably increase in the near future;  
  • Cancer survivors report that being able to work is one of the most important contributors to their quality of life;
  • Cancer survivors in general are more likely to be unemployed than the general healthy population;
  • Health care providers frequently do not ask cancer patients and survivors the essential question: "how are the diagnosis and treatment affecting your work?";
  • About two-third of cancer survivors is able to (partly) return to work at some point after diagnosis and treatment;


 

​Saskia Duijts, PhD​

 Program Leader, Oncology - University Medical Center in Groning, NL
Dr. Saskia Duijts is a senior researcher who received her PhD in Occupational Health Epidemiology in 2007. She worked a few years in Cancer Epidemiology, and since 2010, she started to combine both interests, primarily doing research in ‘Cancer and Work’. Currently, as a Program Leader, she is expanding her research towards ‘Oncology in Primary Care’. She is an editor for the European Journal of Cancer Care, and the chair of the Dutch Cancer Society Psycho Oncology Committee.



Co-moderators:

Christine Maheu, RN, PhD

Associate Professor, Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University and Co-director of Cancer and Work

Dr. Christine Maheu is an Associate Professor in the Ingram School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University and FRQS Chercheur Boursier Junior 2. Dr. Maheu is also an Affiliate Scientist at the University Health Network and the University of Toronto. At McGill University, she teaches research methods, supervises graduate students (masters, doctoral, post-doctoral), mentors practicing nurses and students in research, and conducts research in English and French. She has held research awards with the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Canadian Cancer Society, and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. These awards funded her research in psychosocial oncology, which focuses on developing and testing psychosocial interventions or measurements tools for various cancer populations. Additionally, in partnership with Ipsos Canada and funded by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, she is co-leading a nationwide survey of the needs of cancer patients for transition care from the end of their treatment to three years after their diagnosis. Dr. Maheu received awards for excellence in nursing research (2013, 2015, 2016) from Ovarian Cancer Canada, the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology, and the Quebec Association of Nurses in Oncology.​

Maureen Parkinson, M.Ed. C.C.R.C

Provincial Vocational Rehablitation Counsellor,  BC Cancer and Co-Director of Cancer and Work

Ms. Maureen Parkinson is the province-wide vocational rehabilitation counsellor at the BC Cancer. She has also been vocational rehabilitation counsellor at a public rehabilitation hospital and vocational rehabilitation consultant to insurance companies and the court system. She has instructed and facilitated Service-Canada-funded programs on job searching and career exploration. Ms. Parkinson has a Masters in Counselling Psychology, is a Canadian Certified Rehabilitation Counsellor, and completed the Certified Return to Work Coordinator Program through the National Institute for Disability Management and Research. She has developed return-to-work and job-search seminars for cancer patients and created the guidebook “Cancer and Returning to Work: A Practical Guide for Cancer Patients” as well as on-line articles about returning to work and school. She also co-authored a paper commissioned by the Canadian Association of Psychosocial Oncology, “Cancer and Work: A Canadian Perspective”.

Partially funded by:​
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Last Modified: 1/26/2018 3:58 PM