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Factors Affecting Return to Work After Injury or Illness

Thursday August 30, 2018 at 11:00 AM PT, 2:00 PM ET

 

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Work disability is a major personal, financial and public health burden. With more people living with many types of chronic illnesses now than ever before, the problem of work disability will continue to escalate if we do not take action. Return to work is a major indicator of real-world functioning, therefore predicting future success is a major focus of research. Returning employees to work is complex and involves the interplay of different factors beyond only disease. 

You will learn:

  • The components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework and how they apply to return to work
  • Common prognostic factors associated with return to work outcomes
  • Modifiable prognostic factors
  • Principles of successful return to work

Take home messages:

  • The health condition itself is not that important in influencing return to work
  • Expectations of recovery and return-to-work, pain and disability levels, depression, workplace factors, and access to multidisciplinary resources are important modifiable factors in progressing RTW across health and injury conditions
  • This information can be used to facilitate RTW for injured/ill workers regardless of the specific injury or illness


 

Carol Cancelliere, PhD​

CCRF Research Chair in Knowledge Translation​ 

UOIT-CMCC Centre for Disability Prevention and Rehabilitation

Dr. Carol Cancelliere is a clinical epidemiologist, with a wealth of experience as a chiropractic clinician and researcher. She practiced as a chiropractor for 10 years before completing a Masters of Public Health, after which she led a large international research collaboration that investigated the prognosis and management of mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, in adults, children, athletes, and the military. Her PhD investigated the incidence and prognosis of post-traumatic headache in adults. She also did a research practicum at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, investigating the epidemiology of mild traumatic brain injury visits to emergency departments in the U.S.   Her postdoctoral work focused on developing and implementing an evidence-based care pathway for chiropractors managing spinal pain in the Canadian Armed Forces.​


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Last Modified: 1/26/2018 3:58 PM