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Chronic Pain, Anger and Grief

Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 11:00 AM PT, 2:00 PM ET
Recorded in Wednesday, November 29, 2017, 11:00 AM PT, 2:00 PM ET

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At first glance, a presentation that brings chronic pain, grief and anger together might seem strange.  However, these three are often intertwined in those who experience chronic pain.  For those with chronic pain, the topic is a no-brainer:  they know all about grief and anger.  But when do grief and anger become problematic?  Can either grief or anger increase or lower pain perception or vice versa?  Is there anything to learn from listening to grief and anger and how can we listen to our emotional experience?  Is there such a thing as toxic grief or anger?  What can be done, if anything, when grief seems prolonged or anger excessive?

Learning outcomes:
  • To learn now chronic pain, grief and anger are interrelated.
  • To learn the value and limitations of a stage model of grief.
  • To learn the difference between primary and secondary emotional experience and the importance of this distinction to our topic.
  • To learn an adaptive view of emotions like grief and anger
  • To learn whether grief and anger can become toxic and when.
  • To learn psychological coping strategies when grief seems prolonged or anger excessive​
 

 

Wesley Buch Ph.D., R. Psych.

Clinical & Rehabilitation Psychology
Behavioural Health Care ​​

Dr. Wesley Buch is a registered psychologist who practices in the area of clinical and rehabilitation psychology. In 1997 he co-founded Behavioural Health Care with an interest in individually-tailored, cognitive-behavioural approaches to chronic conditions that emphasize the home, community facilities and workplace as rehabilitation clinic.

Currently, Dr. Buch’s focus is on psycholegal assessment and the treatment of complex forms of human suffering, such as chronic pain. He has research interests in pain-related fear and risk factors for clinical distress in caregivers and clergy. He has teaching interests in chronic pain, collaboration between psychologists and clergy, and the similarities and differences between clinical psychology and the ancient care of souls’ traditions of many spiritualities and religious groups. He is pleased to serve on the Board of Directs of PainBC a charitable organization dedicated to British Columbians with chronic pain.​
  

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